DINOSAURS ROCK®

ID Chart

ID CHART

Identify Your Specimens Here - Fossils, Minerals & Gemstones

Stacks Image 313557
Identify What You Found…

Fossil AMMONITES

Ammonites lived during the periods of Earth history known as the Jurassic and Cretaceous. They became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous Period at roughly the same time as the dinosaurs disappeared. Ammonites were marine animals and had a coiled external shell similar to the modern pearly nautilus.

Fossil Pink Brachiopods
Brachiopods have a very long history of life on Earth (at least 550 million years). They first appear as fossils in rocks of earliest Cambrian age, and their descendants survive, albeit relatively rarely, in today's oceans and seas. They were particularly abundant during the Palaeozoic Era (248 to 545 million years ago), and are often the most common fossils in rock of that age.

Fossil White Cephalopods
Cephalopods have a very long history of life on Earth (at least 550 million years). They first appear as fossils in rocks of earliest Cambrian age, and their descendants survive, albeit relatively rarely, in today's oceans and seas. They were particularly abundant during the Palaeozoic Era (248 to 545 million years ago), and are often the most common fossils in rock of that age.

Fossil Clams
Bivalves have inhabited the Earth for over 500 million years. They first appeared in the Middle Cambrian, about 300 million years before the dinosaurs. They flourished in the Mesozoic and Cainozoic eras, and abound in modern seas and oceans; their shells litter beaches across the globe.

Stacks Image 398095

Fossil Crinoids
Because many crinoids resemble flowers, with their cluster of waving arms atop a long stem, they are sometimes called sea lilies. But crinoids are not plants. Like their relatives--starfishes, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and brittle stars--crinoids are echinoderms, animals with rough, spiny surfaces and a special kind of radial symmetry based on five or multiples of five.
Crinoids have lived in the world's oceans since at least the beginning of the Ordovician Period, roughly 490 million years ago.

Stacks Image 398099

Fossil Dinosaur Bone
Utah, over 65 Million Years Old
• Dinosaur fossils have been found on every continent of Earth, including Antarctica.
• Fossils help us understand what the dinosaurs were like. Information can be gathered from sources such as fossilized bones, footprints, stomach stones, feces, internal organs, soft tissues, eggs and feathers.
• Over 1000 different species of dinosaurs have been named and the list continues to grow as new fossils are discovered.
• Some of the largest fossilized dinosaur eggs ever discovered were found in China in the mid 1990’s. The eggs are over 60cm (2ft) long and 20cm (8in) wide.

Stacks Image 398103

Fossil (Orthoceras) Sea Squid - Morocco - Ordivician Period (300 million Years Old)
Ancient Mollusk, The Orthoceras. ... Orthoceras was an ancient mollusk that lived more than 300 million years ago. The name means straight horn, referring to the characteristic long, straight, conical shell. The preserved shell is all that remains of this ancestor of our modern-day squid.

Stacks Image 398107

Fossil Coral
Corals are simple animals that secrete skeletons made of calcium carbonate. They are close relatives of sea anemones and jellyfish and are the main reef builders in modern oceans. Corals can be either colonial or solitary.
As fossils, corals are found worldwide in sedimentary rocks. Based on these fossils, we know that the corals began their long evolutionary history in the Middle Cambrian, over 510 million years ago. In Kansas, they are fairly common in Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks, deposited from about 315 to 250 million years ago.

Stacks Image 398113

Fossil Shark Teeth - Morocco - Sand Tiger Shark - over 33 Million Years Old (Eocene Period)
A shark tooth is one of the numerous teeth of a shark. A shark tooth contains resistant calcium phosphate materials. Sharks continually shed their teeth; some sharks shed approximately 35,000 teeth in a lifetime, as well as replace them by producing thousands of more. There are four basic types of shark teeth: dense flattened, needle-like, pointed lower with triangular upper, and non-functional. The type of tooth that a shark has depends on its diet and feeding habits.

POLISHED AGATES FROM BRAZIL

Stacks Image 305150
Stacks Image 305152
Stacks Image 398018
Stacks Image 398020

AMETHYST CRYSTAL

Stacks Image 305154

Amethyst Crystals

QUARTZ CRYSTAL

Stacks Image 305156

Quartz Crystal

CITRINE CRYSTAL

Stacks Image 305158

Citrine Crystal

Stacks Image 398031

Aquamarine Gemstone

Stacks Image 398033

Emerald Gemstone

Stacks Image 398035

Garnet

Stacks Image 398037

Ruby Gemstone

Stacks Image 398039

Herkimer Diamonds

Stacks Image 398045

Peridot Gemstone

Stacks Image 398117

Watermelon Tourmaline Gemstone

e-mail: info@dinosaursrock.com

1-800-411-DINO (3466)